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Search: MSC category 14A25 ( Elementary questions )

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1. CMB 2009 (vol 53 pp. 247)

Etingof, P.; Malcolmson, P.; Okoh, F.
Root Extensions and Factorization in Affine Domains
An integral domain R is IDPF (Irreducible Divisors of Powers Finite) if, for every non-zero element a in R, the ascending chain of non-associate irreducible divisors in R of $a^{n}$ stabilizes on a finite set as n ranges over the positive integers, while R is atomic if every non-zero element that is not a unit is a product of a finite number of irreducible elements (atoms). A ring extension S of R is a \emph{root extension} or \emph{radical extension} if for each s in S, there exists a natural number $n(s)$ with $s^{n(s)}$ in R. In this paper it is shown that the ascent and descent of the IDPF property and atomicity for the pair of integral domains $(R,S)$ is governed by the relative sizes of the unit groups $\operatorname{U}(R)$ and $\operatorname{U}(S)$ and whether S is a root extension of R. The following results are deduced from these considerations. An atomic IDPF domain containing a field of characteristic zero is completely integrally closed. An affine domain over a field of characteristic zero is IDPF if and only if it is completely integrally closed. Let R be a Noetherian domain with integral closure S. Suppose the conductor of S into R is non-zero. Then R is IDPF if and only if S is a root extension of R and $\operatorname{U}(S)/\operatorname{U}(R)$ is finite.

Categories:13F15, 14A25

2. CMB 2002 (vol 45 pp. 284)

Sancho de Salas, Fernando
Residue: A Geometric Construction
A new construction of the ordinary residue of differential forms is given. This construction is intrinsic, \ie, it is defined without local coordinates, and it is geometric: it is constructed out of the geometric structure of the local and global cohomology groups of the differentials. The Residue Theorem and the local calculation then follow from geometric reasons.

Category:14A25

3. CMB 1998 (vol 41 pp. 442)

Chamberland, Marc; Meisters, Gary
A Mountain Pass to the Jacobian Conjecture.
This paper presents an approach to injectivity theorems via the Mountain Pass Lemma and raises an open question. The main result of this paper (Theorem~1.1) is proved by means of the Mountain Pass Lemma and states that if the eigenvalues of $F' (\x)F' (\x)^{T}$ are uniformly bounded away from zero for $\x \in \hbox{\Bbbvii R}^{n}$, where $F \colon \hbox{\Bbbvii R}^n \rightarrow \hbox{\Bbbvii R}^n$ is a class $\cC^{1}$ map, then $F$ is injective. This was discovered in a joint attempt by the authors to prove a stronger result conjectured by the first author: Namely, that a sufficient condition for injectivity of class $\cC^{1}$ maps $F$ of $\hbox{\Bbbvii R}^n$ into itself is that all the eigenvalues of $F'(\x)$ are bounded away from zero on $\hbox{\Bbbvii R}^n$. This is stated as Conjecture~2.1. If true, it would imply (via {\it Reduction-of-Degree}) {\it injectivity of polynomial maps} $F \colon \hbox{\Bbbvii R}^n \rightarrow \hbox{\Bbbvii R}^n$ {\it satisfying the hypothesis}, $\det F'(\x) \equiv 1$, of the celebrated Jacobian Conjecture (JC) of Ott-Heinrich Keller. The paper ends with several examples to illustrate a variety of cases and known counterexamples to some natural questions.

Keywords:Injectivity, ${\cal C}^1$-maps, polynomial maps, Jacobian Conjecture, Mountain Pass
Categories:14A25, 14E09

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