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Search: MSC category 05C55 ( Generalized Ramsey theory [See also 05D10] )

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1. CJM 2012 (vol 65 pp. 222)

Sauer, N. W.
Distance Sets of Urysohn Metric Spaces
A metric space $\mathrm{M}=(M;\operatorname{d})$ is {\em homogeneous} if for every isometry $f$ of a finite subspace of $\mathrm{M}$ to a subspace of $\mathrm{M}$ there exists an isometry of $\mathrm{M}$ onto $\mathrm{M}$ extending $f$. The space $\mathrm{M}$ is {\em universal} if it isometrically embeds every finite metric space $\mathrm{F}$ with $\operatorname{dist}(\mathrm{F})\subseteq \operatorname{dist}(\mathrm{M})$. (With $\operatorname{dist}(\mathrm{M})$ being the set of distances between points in $\mathrm{M}$.) A metric space $\boldsymbol{U}$ is an {\em Urysohn} metric space if it is homogeneous, universal, separable and complete. (It is not difficult to deduce that an Urysohn metric space $\boldsymbol{U}$ isometrically embeds every separable metric space $\mathrm{M}$ with $\operatorname{dist}(\mathrm{M})\subseteq \operatorname{dist}(\boldsymbol{U})$.) The main results are: (1) A characterization of the sets $\operatorname{dist}(\boldsymbol{U})$ for Urysohn metric spaces $\boldsymbol{U}$. (2) If $R$ is the distance set of an Urysohn metric space and $\mathrm{M}$ and $\mathrm{N}$ are two metric spaces, of any cardinality with distances in $R$, then they amalgamate disjointly to a metric space with distances in $R$. (3) The completion of every homogeneous, universal, separable metric space $\mathrm{M}$ is homogeneous.

Keywords:partitions of metric spaces, Ramsey theory, metric geometry, Urysohn metric space, oscillation stability
Categories:03E02, 22F05, 05C55, 05D10, 22A05, 51F99

2. CJM 2011 (vol 64 pp. 1201)

Aistleitner, Christoph; Elsholtz, Christian
The Central Limit Theorem for Subsequences in Probabilistic Number Theory
Let $(n_k)_{k \geq 1}$ be an increasing sequence of positive integers, and let $f(x)$ be a real function satisfying \begin{equation} \tag{1} f(x+1)=f(x), \qquad \int_0^1 f(x) ~dx=0,\qquad \operatorname{Var_{[0,1]}} f \lt \infty. \end{equation} If $\lim_{k \to \infty} \frac{n_{k+1}}{n_k} = \infty$ the distribution of \begin{equation} \tag{2} \frac{\sum_{k=1}^N f(n_k x)}{\sqrt{N}} \end{equation} converges to a Gaussian distribution. In the case $$ 1 \lt \liminf_{k \to \infty} \frac{n_{k+1}}{n_k}, \qquad \limsup_{k \to \infty} \frac{n_{k+1}}{n_k} \lt \infty $$ there is a complex interplay between the analytic properties of the function $f$, the number-theoretic properties of $(n_k)_{k \geq 1}$, and the limit distribution of (2). In this paper we prove that any sequence $(n_k)_{k \geq 1}$ satisfying $\limsup_{k \to \infty} \frac{n_{k+1}}{n_k} = 1$ contains a nontrivial subsequence $(m_k)_{k \geq 1}$ such that for any function satisfying (1) the distribution of $$ \frac{\sum_{k=1}^N f(m_k x)}{\sqrt{N}} $$ converges to a Gaussian distribution. This result is best possible: for any $\varepsilon\gt 0$ there exists a sequence $(n_k)_{k \geq 1}$ satisfying $\limsup_{k \to \infty} \frac{n_{k+1}}{n_k} \leq 1 + \varepsilon$ such that for every nontrivial subsequence $(m_k)_{k \geq 1}$ of $(n_k)_{k \geq 1}$ the distribution of (2) does not converge to a Gaussian distribution for some $f$. Our result can be viewed as a Ramsey type result: a sufficiently dense increasing integer sequence contains a subsequence having a certain requested number-theoretic property.

Keywords:central limit theorem, lacunary sequences, linear Diophantine equations, Ramsey type theorem
Categories:60F05, 42A55, 11D04, 05C55, 11K06

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